An Introduction To Bear Awareness. Pt 2 from Lessons Learned As a Novice Hiker

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Felled tree by Marybeth Haydon

Strolling along, enjoying the quiet tranquility of the forest stepping among mild weather, highlighted with a perfect breeze, I duck under a low-lying tree that has slid down the rain-softened mountainside, toppling it across the trail. I check the section that is obscured; I’m ever-snake-aware these days, watchful of my footing, particularly over a larger rock or a felled tree, who knows what’s on the other side? I note that I am sweating profusely as I check for snakes. I don’t like this fear I’ve developed, it’s unhealthy.

As I pass a few piles of bear scat, I’m reminded that I have bear bells in my pack. I’ve never felt the need to use them before but the bells are relentlessly drawing my attention. Finding scat and tracks along this trail is certainly not unusual, why this change of attitude?  The impression is intense enough for me to stop and dig deep into my pack for the bells. I strap them to my trekking poles and continue my most-enjoyable morning trek.

Step jingle, step jingle.
There is sudden, chaotic movement ahead, my heart beats violently; I’m instantly alarmed. Something is just not right, there is an outright panic in the air!  My ears are straining to distinguish the sounds that I hear. I recognize the sound of several hoof beats, at a gallop at that, but there is something far more fearsome, deep, heavy, and threatening. Three panicked deer are charging down the trail, oh man! Do they see me?!  These animals are fast!  I jump to the uphill side of the trail, plastering myself against the rough mountainside.  A huge flying leap from the trail and they swiftly, gracefully disappear deep into the downhill brush.

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Photo courtesy Google Images

Then a flat, deep noise that challenges my bladder control. This noise completely rattles my insides, weakens my bones and muscles. Undoubtedly this is a large animal making this noise; the air is motionless and thick with fear.

My fear.

Then what sounds like a smaller animal, makes a sort of baying sound, almost a sheep-like “ba”, but not. Maybe it’s “ma, maw”.  It sounds confused, if that’s possible, maybe frightened. I can’t explain it. Oh snap! More hard, deep and yet with an odd hollowness, chomping. Now I hear oruff, errhh, then a deep, heavy growl similar to the warning growl from a dog. The kind of growl you hear right before it attacks.

I’m suddenly drowning in a whirlpool of fear and panic.
It sounds like a large animal, panting  with angry, heavy stomping and scraping against the earth.  The snorting sounds like a charging bull that terrifies me beyond reason. Huff, pant, eerrhh.  The noise is a psychological stun gun, keeps me from moving. I’m literally frozen in place. There’s chaotic noises among the brush, a different growl, then a howl, almost a yip, like it was injured, definitely a different animal.  Are there two animals fighting? Now there’s heavy stomping, scraping, it’s the larger animal. Instinctive fear envelopes me. I feel as though I’m made of jig-saw puzzle pieces and each piece is about to unhinge from one another.
Silence. Heavy silence. Intimidating silence. Scary silence. Silence that is LOUD.
I look down at my chest to see if I am still breathing because i’m really not sure. Then I close my eyes, I’m trying really hard to refocus, to center myself, to trust my Savior. I’m afraid to look up or to look in any direction. My knees are buckling, an insane thought flashes through my mind: camera.  I immediately dismiss it. I need to preserve myself first! Not exactly a Kodak moment here…

The forest is very, very still. Not a single squirrel stirred, not a single bird chirped, even the lizards sunning their selves have simply vanished. I think even the ants are frozen in their tracks. It’s as if a mega pause button has been pressed throughout the woods, with the entire world in slow motion.

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Angry Bear photo courtesy Google Images

Frantic, bizarre thoughts swirl: I think about the sound of crashing ocean waves, about the thrill of riding horseback at a smooth canter, about the stupid mending pile at my home … I need new tires for my car soon … HAVE I LOST MY MIND?
I don’t know how long I stayed plastered against the mountain. It seems as though I am waking up from a deep coma, my mind a little foggy, taking a bit to orient, I don’t trust my legs to support my walking much less standing. Standing still as though I’m part of this rough mountainside seems to be all that I can muster. I need to feel camouflaged. I am rock and leaves and dirt.   I am the mountain.

Seeing nothing swing out from the bushes, no horrified deer charging my way, no more nerve-shattering dinosaur-level snapping sound, just the usual bit of small animal activity. Once again, the world around me is back to normal. Oh, the joy of the “little things” in life!   I realize the threat is gone. Deep breath. Loosen the tight neck, swirling my head slowly.   I reach for my fallen trekking poles. They jingle.
Bear bells.
The bells that I have never used before. Until today.  Thank God for giving me a heads up, for causing me to step aside momentarily.  Who knows what the timing would have been, how this “encounter” may have changed if I had not stopped for a few minutes to strap on the bells?

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Tranquility by Marybeth Haydon

“All those who know Your mercy, Lord, will count on You for help. For You have never forsaken those who trust in You.” Psalm 9:10
“God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble.” Psalm 46:1
Lord, I want others to know just how accessible You are!

Todays Lesson Learned:  The importance of being bear aware and never negotiate a blind trail-corner quietly. You never want to surprise a wild animal, much less a mother bear and cub.  Whether you use bear bells (not my favorite) or chat with your partner, lightly clap your hands as you approach a bind corner, or simply sing softly as you relish your environment, these are all good methods to prevent a surprise for you or the animal.  Pay attention to “warning signs” such as fresh bear scat, a fresh kill, etc. and adjust your trip accordingly. DO NOT HIKE QUIETLY.

Wondering why I (temporarily) developed a fear of snakes?  See my post The Day I Stood On A Western Diamondback Rattler here at   http://ow.ly/j3LdM  Enjoy!

Visit me on Facebook for offers, photos, hiking and wildlife updates!   http://ow.ly/hycIm

You can also visit me on Twitter @MarybethHaydon

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One thought on “An Introduction To Bear Awareness. Pt 2 from Lessons Learned As a Novice Hiker

  1. Pingback: Caught In a Wildfire Pt.5 from Lessons Learned As a Novice Hiker | The Wilderness Experience

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