7 Things Not To Do At a Campground

 

camping_fire

By Dave Seminara

I love to camp with my wife and two little boys, ages 3 and 5. I’d say that 75-80 percent of the campers we’ve encountered over the years have been good people who understand the need to be considerate while sleeping with fellow travelers in the great outdoors. But it only takes one dud to ruin your camping experience.

A bad camping trip can make the pleasures of home seem awfully enticing.  A great one can remind you of how magical camping can be–given the right circumstances and neighbors.

I prefer to camp at state and national parks because the tent sites tend to be cheaper and more spacious than private campgrounds, where you can sometimes feel like you are stacked on top of your fellow campers. But if you don’t plan far ahead, getting a coveted site at a state or national park on a summer weekend can be extremely difficult.

No matter where you pop your tent, here are seven things not to do a campground.

  • 1Check-in late at night

    iStock

    What’s it like to be near someone who decides to check in late at night? Last summer, on a rainy night at a state park in Vermont, we heard noises very close to our tent after midnight.  We were alarmed because it was a Monday night and the place had totally cleared out after the weekend, with just one family left in our vicinity. Our paranoia grew when a bright, blinding light illuminated our tent. When we had checked in, a park ranger had mentioned that there had been some bear sightings and we feared that the rangers were tracking a bear near our campsite. Eventually, we fell asleep without further incident. The next morning, we found out that the noises we heard were late arriving campers who used their high beams, pointed right into our tent, as they set up their tent in the rain. Some campgrounds police arrival times, but many don’t. There is no graceful way to set up camp in the middle of the night, so please, just don’t do it.

  • 2Get drunk

    iStock

    For every one person who becomes quiet and introspective when intoxicated, there are a dozen who get loud and obnoxious. If you stay reasonably coherent, you’ll be less likely to annoy your neighbors.

  • 3Bring a yappy dog

    iStock

    No one thinks that their dog is annoying, but we all know that some pets are better off left home. The only thing worse than a camper who stands by idly as their dog barks at passersby, squirrels or for no reason at all, is one who leaves their dog or dogs chained up, unattended at their campsite while they go off for the day. If you have a dog that likes to bark, buy them a citronella collar or leave them at home.

  • 4Ignore quiet hours rules

    iStock

    This is the most important and often ignored camping etiquette rule in the book. Nearly every campground has rules prohibiting noise late at night and early in the morning, but most places also don’t have the staff to enforce them. At a Kampgrounds of America campground near St. Joseph, Michigan, in July, we wound up next to a trio of women who woke us up at 5 a.m. (4 a.m. in our time zone) with loud chatter, right outside our tent, slamming their car door repeatedly, and allowing their dog to bark incessantly. When I got dressed and walked out in the darkness to confront them, they made no apologies. “We have a race to get to,” one said, as though that justified waking others up in the pre-dawn hours on a Sunday morning.

  • 5Leave behind your bar of used soap, especially if it’s hairy

    You might justify leaving your bar of soap thinking that someone might have forgotten to bring theirs, but I can assure you that no one wants to use your leftover soap, so please take it with you.

     

  • 6Bring your boom box

    iStock

    I don’t care how good you think your taste in music is — the truth is that no one wants to hear it except for you. Headphones are a glorious invention, but since too many campers fail to pack them, don’t forget your earplugs.

  • 7The other obvious stuff

    iStock

    One would think that campers would know not to snap the branches off of trees for firewood, drive fast around the campground, litter, and leave a fire unattended, but I’ve seen people do all of these things. Everyone slips up occasionally but a little common courtesy goes a long way, especially in the great outdoors.

Advertisements

I just might use this same approach! It’s so funny, it just might work

Revive

Computer_Oma old womanShown below, is an actual letter that was sent to a bank by an 86 year old woman.

 

 

The bank manager thought it amusing enough to have it published in the New York Times.
Dear  Sir:
I am writing to thank you for bouncing my check with which I endeavored to pay my plumber last month.

By my calculations, three nanoseconds must have elapsed between his presenting the check and the arrival in my account of the funds  needed to honor it…

I refer, of course, to the automatic monthly deposit of my entire pension, an arrangement which, I admit, has been in place for only eight years.

You are to be commended for seizing that brief window of opportunity, and also for debiting my account $30 by way of penalty for the inconvenience caused to your bank.

My thankfulness springs from the manner in which this incident has caused me to rethink my errant financial ways. I noticed that whereas I personally answer your telephone calls and letters, — when…

View original post 426 more words

A Hotel Built Into What?

r-CAVE-HOTEL-large570

Shimao Wonderland Intercontinental Construction Is Underway

Adventure will meet luxury at the Shimao Wonderland Intercontinental, a five-star hotel currently being built into the side of an abandoned quarry Songjiang District of Shanghai.

The hotel, designed by the British firm Atkins, is set to have 19 stories and 380 rooms. Its facade will line one portion of a 100-meter-deep cave-like quarry at the base of the Tianmenshan Mountain.

The quarry that will soon house the Shimao is partly flooded, meaning the lowest levels are set to be submerged under water, a rising trend in futuristic hotel design. The two underwater levels will feature an aquarium, an underwater restaurant and guest rooms.

Adrenaline junkies will be in close proximity to activities such as rock climbing, bungee jumping and watersports, while those looking for a more relaxing retreat can admire eco-friendly roof gardens, a swimming pool, a sports center and unparalleled scenery — including a waterfall.

According to the Daily Mail, the hotel is set to open in 2015, with rooms starting around $300 a night.

slide_305379_2622751_free2

slide_305379_2622752_free3

 

I’m Packing My Bags Now!

5 Treehouse Vacation Rentals

Travelers can indulge their inner child with these amazing treehouse properties, all available for private rental. Whether in search of close-to-home luxury, a faraway escape or just a little bit of adventure, one of these vacation rentals will surely suit one’s needs. Check out the five treehouse homes TripAdvisor recommends for vacation rentals.

Exotic Treehouse at Kilauea Volcano on Big Island, Big Island, Hawaii

ht_exotic_treehouse_hawaii_tk_130605_wmainThe Exotic Treehouse is a romantic perch in the rainforest for two to linger. There is a queen-sized bed, cedar hot tub on the lanai, outdoor shower and more. It is built mid-canopy in the forest, overlooking tree ferns and almost eye-level with the upper canopy. The treehouse is less than five minutes from the gate to Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Volcano Village is a short walk, with restaurants and galleries. As one TripAdvisor traveler said, “Most unique place we’ve ever stayed.” It has one bedroom and sleeps two people; prices start at $200 per night.

 

Tropical Treehouse, Rincon, Puerto Rico

ht_tropical_treehouse_puerto_rico_tk_130605_wmainLocated on 12 acres of hardwood forest and bamboo groves, this treehouse provides a secluded retreat with spectacular views of the Caribbean sea. It has one bedroom and sleeps two people; prices start at $150 per night.

 

 

 

Treehouse Hideaway- Hot tub & Log burner, Canterbury, UK

ht_treehouse_hideaway_canterbury_uk_tk_130605_wmainNearly 20 feet high, this treehouse allows its guests to sit amongst the willows, conifers and fruit trees. Relax in the hot tub, warm up in front of the log fire or enjoy a cocktail on the verandah. As one TripAdvisor traveler said, “Romantic, luxurious, a hidden treasure.” It has one bedroom and sleeps two; prices start at $228 per night.

 

 

 

Into the Woods Tree House, Whippingham, UK

ht_into_the_woods_whippingham_uk_tk_130605_wmainCome and stay in a cozy and exciting little house in the trees. Fantastic for adventurous families, but equally wonderful as a romantic break for couples, or a unique treat for groups of friends. The treehouse is divided into two separate pods – the Living Pod and the Sleeping Pod and joined by smart decking. The Living Pod includes one lovely timber clad room with kitchen area, dining table and benches, and sofa – and is heated with a cozy logburning stove. French doors lead out onto a sunny decking area for al fresco eating and relaxing. As one TripAdvisor traveler said, “Into the Woods exceeded all hopes and expectations.” It has two bedrooms and sleeps six; prices start at $228 per night.

The Treehouse, Taunton, UK

ht_the_treehouse_taunton_uk_tk_130605_wmainThe Treehouse is situated in the beautiful conservation village of Halse in Somerset, in an area of outstanding natural beauty between Exmoor, the Brendon, Blackdown and Quantock Hills. It has a private hot tub and use of an indoor heated swimming pool every afternoon. It has two bedrooms and sleeps five; prices start at $229 per night.